Muddyboots

Follow the fortunes of Muddyboots & Family on their East Yorkshire farm which has changed from dairy farm to luxury ice cream manufacture

Tuesday, 15 May 2007

lost villages, crumbling cliffs,


Life here on the coast has now returned to normal. The rain has fallen, the sky is bright blue & the sun is shining. The rabbits are everywhere No more unpleasant occurrences. Peace reigns.


Yesterday evening the local BBC TV programme came from this part of the coast looking at coastal erosion. Reporter on ground talking to couple whose house was falling into the sea & an airborne reporter looking down at the mud cliffs & beach. As with much local TV things didn't go exactly as planned. The aerial shots where in 'bits', resulting in a bit of this & a bit of that. Really annoying especially as l was interested in the commentary, or the bits that came through like. What is gossip-worthy is that this particular couple had bought the property at a very low price a few years back knowing full well that there was only a very limited life span on their building. Over the past moths their plight has been followed by the TV cameras. The local indigenous population have lived with the shrinking coastline in this part of the world for centuries, well since the North Sea was formed l would guess. Over the millennia the people of Holderness have been loosing farm land, towns & villages to th sea, each time moving settlements further inland from the coast. Out there in the North Sea on rough nights, if you listen really hard..... you can hear the bells of those lost churches ringing for their long dead congregations.


The rain has perked up all things botanical. The new trees are splurting ahead with new leaves & stems shooting upwards, even the May blossom's scent is now permeating the scene. There's something magical about the may. The scent always reminds me of one of the pony fields that was surrounded by huge hawthorn hedges which would erupt into drifts of pungent smelling blossom every spring, then covering everything in petal snow as the flowers dropped. l will always remember that smell..........Quite overpowering.

7 comments:

Yorkshire Pudding said...

The lost villages of Holderness...so sad...but that's Nature for you - reminding us that we are only human beings - tiny ants on the face of a wrinkly old orange. Between Barmston and Hornsea... intriguing. Atwick? Skipsea? Ulrome? Beeford? Obviously you don't want to be too specific as I might be a mad axe murderer!

Blossomcottage said...

Nature always takes back what it gives in the end, we must enjoy it whilst it lasts, nice blog I enjoyed it.
Blossom

Milkmaid said...

So glad that peace has returned to your domain, the blossom on the way to schoolthis morning was like snow on the road, so much had fallen due to the rain, it was all going mushy, just like snow

sally's chateau said...

Hmmmm now feel it is my duty to bring forth hot sunshine from South of France and not mention the rain ...

Suffolkmum said...

I love going to Dunwich sometimes on the Suffolk coast and thinking of the town that used to be there. Like you say, the local population has been adapting to the encroaching north sea for millenia. Love the smell of May blossom too.

Pondside said...

Hi Muddy - I've just been getting caught up on the blogs - can't ever just write one comment your blogs as they are all so different. So - for this one - we also have erosion problems on the coast -very sad here too. Your line re the bells tolling for lost congregations really got m!

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